Iontophoresis is a therapeutic modality often used by physical therapists. It is a type of electrical stimulation that is used to administer medication into your body through your skin.

How Does Iontophoresis Work?

To understand the basic principles of iontophoresis, you should remember some basic lessons from physics and chemistry class. In general, ionic charges that are alike will repel one another, while ions that are oppositely charged will be attracted to one another.

So if you have a medicine in a solution that is negatively charged and you apply a negative electrical charge to it, the medicine in solution will be pushed away, or repelled, from the negative electricity. When using iontophoresis, your physical therapist is using electricity to push medicine into your injured tissues.

The medication used in iontophoresis is ionically charged. So if your physical therapist decides to introduce medication into your injured tissues via iontophoresis and that medication is negatively charged, he or she will use a negative current to drive that medication into your body.

Common Uses for Iontophoresis

There are many different uses for iontophoresis. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Decrease inflammation
  • Decrease pain
  • Decrease muscle spasm
  • Decrease swelling and edema
  • Reduce calcium deposits in the body
  • Manage scar tissue

Your physical therapist will work with you to decide on the treatment goals and the rationale for using iontophoresis.