Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a progressively painful hand and arm condition caused by a pinched nerve in your wrist. A number of factors can contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome, including the anatomy of your wrist, certain underlying health problems and possibly patterns of hand use.

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Bound by bones and ligaments, the carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway - about as big around as your thumb - located on the palm side of your wrist. This tunnel protects a main nerve to your hand and nine tendons that bend your fingers. Compression of the nerve produces the numbness, pain and, eventually, hand weakness that characterize carpal tunnel syndrome.

Carpal tunnel syndrome typically starts gradually with a vague aching in your wrist that can extend to your hand or forearm.

Symptoms:

  • Tingling or numbness in your fingers or hand, especially your thumb and index, middle or ring fingers, but not your little finger. This sensation often occurs while holding a steering wheel, phone or newspaper or just after waking up. Many people "shake out" their hands to try to relieve their symptoms. As the disorder progresses, the numb feeling may become constant.
  • Pain radiating or extending from your wrist up your arm to your shoulder or down into your palm or fingers, especially after forceful or repetitive use. This usually occurs on the palm side of your forearm.
  • A sense of weakness in your hands and a tendency to drop objects.

 

Physical therapy is a highly effective treatment for wrist tendinitis. You will work with your physical therapist to devise a treatment plan that is specific to your condition and goals. Your individual treatment program may include:

10 Reasons-Fun.jpgPain Management. Your physical therapist will help you identify and avoid painful movements, and show you how to correct abnormal postures to reduce stress on the wrist. Your therapist may recommend resting the wrist short-term, and applying ice to the area to help alleviate pain. Your physical therapist also may apply a wrist brace to restrict wrist movement, allowing the tendons to heal.

Manual Therapy. Your physical therapist may use manual techniques, such as gentle joint movements, soft-tissue massage, and wrist stretches to get your wrist moving properly.

Range-of-Motion Exercises. You will learn exercises and stretches to reduce stiffness and help your wrist, hand, and forearm begin to move properly.

Strengthening Exercises. Your physical therapist will determine which strengthening exercises are right for you, depending on your specific areas of weakness. The entire arm, including the shoulder, elbow, and wrist, can potentially be weakened and contribute to the movement dysfunction that causes tendinitis. Your physical therapist will design an individualized home-exercise program to meet your specific needs and goals, which you can continue long after you have completed your formal physical therapy.

Patient Education. Depending on the specific activities you plan on resuming, your physical therapist will teach you ways to perform actions, while protecting your wrist and hand. For example, keeping the wrist in a neutral position to reduce excessive force while performing repetitive tasks, and taking frequent breaks are ways to decrease your chances of reinjury.
Functional Training. As your symptoms improve, your physical therapist will teach you how to correctly perform functional movement patterns using proper wrist mechanics, such as typing on a computer or swinging a racquet. This training will help you return to pain-free function on the job, at home, and when playing sports.